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COMMON CORE FOR TEACHERS

CCSS Math Resources for Teachers

CA Math Standards:

http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/ccssmathstandardaug2013.pdf

 

Bureau of Labor Statistics

http://www.bls.gov/

 

Occupational Outlook Handbook: Includes stats on jobs gathered by the BLS (see above)

http://www.bls.gov/ooh/

 

U.S. Census Bureau

 http://www.census.gov

 

World Bank Data (education, poverty, environment, etc)

http://data.worldbank.org/topic

 

Stanford Dept of Statistics

http://www-stat.stanford.edu/

 

 UC Berkeley Dept of Statistics

http://statistics.berkeley.edu/

 

Zanran.com (Search engine for charts, graphs, & stats--thanks Ariela Koehler for this one!)

http://zanran.com/q/ 

 

CCSS Literacy in SocSci, Sci, Tech Resources for Teachers

World Issues Project Resources

Opposing Viewpoints database

A database of a variety of sources (primary, reference, periodical, etc.) dedicated to controversial issues. Available through Alameda County Library. No card? Get an e-card here

 

Library of Congress: Primary and Secondary Source Documents for World History

 

Center for History and New Media, George Mason University

This site lists URLs to other good sites. It focuses on primary sources for World History and can be searched by region or time period.

 

National History Day: World History Primary Sources

 

Internet History Sourcebook, Fordham University

This site by a Fordham University History professor is a little hard to browse and has some broken links, but is also HUGE and has a ton of primary sources.

 

Perseus Digital Library, Tufts University Classics Dept.

I find this resource not very searcher-friendly, but it's pretty extensive in certain areas (Ancient Greece & Rome, Middle Ages, etc). Texts have been retyped and do not appear in their original form. The site has a tutorial about how to search it if you get stuck.

 

American History and Government:

QUEST Resources

Internet Public Library

Articles, Op-Eds, Editorials, News Videos

Opposing Viewpoints database

A database of a variety of sources (primary, reference, periodical, etc.) dedicated to controversial issues. Available through Alameda County Library. No card? Get an e-card here

 

Biography in Context

A database of biographical articles about famous individuals, historic and current. Available through Alameda County Library. No card? Get an e-card here

 

American Presidency Project (UCSB): Documents related to the presidency

 

Calisphere

Primary sources database made by the University of California system. (Particularly good source of photographs by historical period).

 

Chronicling America

Provides digitized images of newspapers from 1897-1910. Available through Alameda County Library. No card? Get an e-card here

 

American Memory from the Library of Congress 

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html

 

American Memory, Videos

http://rs6.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/S?ammem/collections:@field%28FLD003+@band%28origf+Motion+Picture%29%29:head 

 

NARA: US National Archives & Records Administration

http://www.archives.gov/

National Archives, Digital Vaults

The "cloudlike" format of this tagged database can make it challenging to search. Try the "Search" choice on the bottom toolbar. 

National Archives: Teaching with Primary Sources

DocsTeach: Selected Primary Source Documents from the National Archives, organized according to the National History Standards

American Rhetoric (speeches):

Includes video, sound recordings as well as printed copies of speeches, both historic and current. Try the Search box. "T", "V", "A" symbols next to speeches indicate presence of text of the speech, video, and/or audio.

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/

 

The Making of America

A joint project of Cornell University and the University of Michigan, this site covers primary sources from the antebellum period through reconstruction.

 

Michigan version of the same site. Different ways to search, but same materials.

Houghton-Mifflin's Primary Sources on the Web

From the publisher, collected URLs where primary sources can be found

Alameda County Primary Source list for teens

FedFlix

Archive of videos produced by the U.S. Gov't. 

Science

Change Project Resources

Internet Public Library

Genetics Home Reference

From the library of Congress, a free genetics database.

Magazines and Journals:

Science

Science Daily

Popular Science

Scientific American

Technical Subjects

 Internet Public Library

 

Mango Languages

An awesome resource for World Language classes available through Alameda County Library. No card? Get an e-card here

 

Audio Book Cloud

Access to audio books that teachers or students can download onto their computers or devices. Especially helpful for supporting ELD students and those with auditory learning styles.

 

Tumblebooks: Libros en espanol

These are for younger readers but may be helpful for Espanol 1 classes. Available through Alameda County Library. No card? Get an e-card here

 

Biography in Context

A database of biographical articles about famous individuals, historic and current. Available through Alameda County Library. Helpful for projects like notable psychologists in Psych classes. No card? Get an e-card here 

Multimedia

Access Video

A lot like Discovery Streaming, but free! Access to educational videos from PBS, BBC, A&E, National Geographic, Ken Burns, Jim Lehrer, and more. Need Alameda Co. library card. No card? Get an e-card here

American Rhetoric (speeches): 

Includes video, sound recordings as well as printed copies of speeches, both historic and current. Try the Search box. "T", "V", "A" symbols next to speeches indicate presence of text of the speech, video, and/or audio. 

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/

TED Talks and Ted Ed (videos and related lesson ideas):

http://www.ted.com/talks

http://ed.ted.com/

Songs Inspired by Literature (SIBL) Project:

Includes information and audio files of songs written about works of literature, including many that we teach at IHS (Odyssey, Night, Grapes of Wrath, etc.)

http://www.artistsforliteracy.org

Library of Congress Political Cartoons and Teacher's Guide:

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/primarysourcesets/political-cartoons/ 

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/primarysourcesets/political-cartoons/pdf/teacher_guide.pdf

PBS Streaming Video:

http://video.pbs.org/

NPR:

http://www.npr.org/

This American Life, and its archive of radio broadcasts about various topics:

http://www.thisamericanlife.org/

http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives

Best of History:

http://www.besthistorysites.net 

Charts, Graphs, and Stats: Zanran.com (Search engine for charts, graphs, & stats--thanks Ariela Koehler for this one!)

http://zanran.com/q/ 

 

Charts, Graphs, and Stats: Wolfram Alpha

 http://www.wolframalpha.com/

Information Literacy and the Research Process (all subjects)

I. Searching


How Google Search Works

In-depth, behind-the-scenes...probably better for you than the students, unless you teach Technology courses.

Google Advanced Search

Google Advanced Search Tips

 

II. Graphic Organizers and Other Tools to support the research process:

The Research Process visual (for teachers)

ABCs of Website Evaluation

EARS

From the incredible U.C. Berkeley History-Social Science Project, a really helpful template for students to analyze the evidence they have found and connect it to the claim they're trying to prove.

 

APPARTS (for deconstructing social science texts)

A SOAPSTone-style strategy that works well for social science texts, from the College Board/AP.

 

III. Source Evaluation (especially online!):

 

ABCs of Website Evaluation

A general worksheet for website evaluation used in our library. Originally inspired by a system called RADCAB (www.radcab.com) and several other sources. There are many versions of this acronym: CARS, CARBS, etc. Choose the elements that are important to your purpose and modify!

 

The ABC's can be modified for particular subject areas. In the case of this photography class, the teacher felt that it was important for an arts discipline to include consideration of the professional or unprofessional appearance of the site and the photographs on it, and to include the level of Detail or comprehensiveness of the source, so it's the AABCDs! (special thanks to Shiloh Burton in the Visual Arts dept.!):

Website Evaluation for Photography

 

Sites useful for demonstrating how information on the Web can be unreliable:

Let kids figure these out on their own by following the ABCs or evaluating in some way--don't reveal too quickly!

-->Dihydrogen Monoxide Research Division

-->Tree Octopus

 

U.C. Berkeley Library Guide on source evaluation:

This detailed web evaluation guide is helpful because it runs the researcher chronologically through the evaluation process starting at the search engine level. This site is good to get students beyond domain suffixes (.com, .gov, etc. Students often give simplistic answers like ".govs are good" when asked to evaluate sites, but it is essential to go beyond this, especially since domain names are not as tightly restricted as they were in the past - http://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/evaluating-resources

 

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/Evaluate.html

 

Checklist from UCB--students can walk through this detailed checklist if the ABCs leave things too open-ended:

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/EvalForm_General.pdf

 

From San Diego State--the Ws:

This SDSU library guide to evaluating information uses a Who/What/When/Where/Why format.

http://library.sdsu.edu/reference/research/evaluating-information

 

Cornell University Library Guide on source evaluation:

This guide is particularly good in terms of what each type of source is supposed to look like (click on first hyperlink)--would be good source for a scavenger hunt

http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/webeval.html

 

Cornell: Critical Appraisal and Analysis:

http://guides.library.cornell.edu/criticallyanalyzing

 

Johns Hopkins:

http://guides.library.jhu.edu/content.php?pid=198142&sid=1657518

 

Bedford/St. Martin's Research & Documentation Online:

From the publisher of Diana Hacker's A Writer's Reference books, a page with some source evaluation questions. Puts a focus on bias, authorship, sponsorship, and author's purpose:

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/tips-for-evaluating-sources.htm

 

Purdue OWL: Evaluating Sources

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/553/01/

 

Purdue OWL: Internet Searching

Ever wonder why certain sites end up on the top of a Google results page and others do not? A great overview of how the Internet works.

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/558/1/