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Playing in College

Initial Eligibility

What you need to know:

Getting Approved To Compete

NCAA

700 W Washington Ave

Indianapolis, IN 46204

(317) 917-6222

 

NCAA Eligibility Center

Certification Processing

PO Box 7136
Indianapolis, IN 46207 

(877) 262-1492 Phone

(317) 968-5100 Fax

SAT College Board Program

PO Box 6200

Princeton, NJ 08541-6200

(609)771-7600 Phone

(609)771-1426 Fax

ACT University Testing

PO Box 4028

Iowa City, IA 52243-4028

(319)337-1448 Phone

(319)337-1285 Fax

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS REGARDING NCAA INITIAL ELIGIBILITY LEGISLATION

1.     When should a student register with the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse?

Students should register with the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse after the completion of their junior year in high school. At this time, a transcript that includes six semesters of grades should be sent to the clearinghouse from the high school. Additionally, students should request that their SAT or ACT test scores be forwarded directly to the clearinghouse by entering code "9999" as a reporting selection when they register for the exam.

2.     How are students prioritized for processing at the clearinghouse?

Students who have their status requested by an NCAA institution are prioritized by the clearinghouse for processing. Students with disabilities and students who individually request a preliminary status report will also be prioritized. If a student's eligibility status is not prioritized in one of these three ways, the clearinghouse may not process the student's file.

3.     How is the NCAA core grade-point average different from a student's overall grade point average (GPA)?

The NCAA core-course grade-point average is calculated using only NCAA-approved core courses in the required core academic areas. High-school grade-point averages generally include the grades from most or all courses attempted in grades nine through 12.

4.     May weighted grades for honors or advanced placement courses be factored into the calculation of the student's core grade-point average?

A school's normal practice of weighting, honors or advanced courses may be used as long as the weighting is used for computing grade-point averages. Weighting cannot be used if the high school weights grades solely for the purpose of determining class rank. Additionally, in no instance may the student receive greater than 1.000 additional quality poinst for purposes of calculating the grade-point average for initial eligibility.

5.     What options are available to students who do not meet the NCAA initial-eligibility standards?

Students who do not meet the initial-eligibility standards may be granted a waiver of their deficiency through the NCAA initial-eligibility waiver process. NCAA academic committees are vested with the authority to authorize waivers of the initial-eligibility requirements based on objective evidence that demonstrates circumstances in which a student's overall academic record warrants a waiver of the normal application of the legislation. The waiver must be filed by an NCAA institution (college or university) on behalf of the student. However, students with a diagnosed disability may file a waiver on their own behalf.

6.     May courses taken in the eighth grade that are high-school core courses (e.g., Algebra I, Spanish I, and Freshman Composition) be used to meet the 13 core-course requirements?

Courses taken in the eighth grade may not be used to satisfy the core-curriculum requirements regardless of the course content or level. However, in the rare event that students need to have courses taken in the eighth grade considered for eligibility purposes, the initial-eligibility waiver process is available (see question No. 5). Note: Courses taken after eighth-grade graduation, but prior to the first regular ninth-grade term (i.e., the summer after eighth grade, but prior to the fall term of ninth grade) may not be used to satisfy the core-curriculum requirements.

7.     May students use courses taken after high-school graduation?

Generally, students who enroll in a NCAA Division I institution may use only courses completed in grades 9 through 12 to meet the NCAA core-curriculum requirements. As a result, courses completed during the summer after high school graduation may not be used to meet the core-curriculum requirements. Students who return after graduation to the high school from which they graduated either may complete addition core courses or may repeat core courses during the postgraduate term or year, in order to meet the core-course requirements. These students cannot enroll in college and participate in intercollegiate athletics until the subsequent fall. Students enrolling in Division 11 institutions and students with disabilities (enrolling in either Divisions I or II) may use core courses taken after high-school graduation to meet the NCAA core-curriculum requirements, provided the courses are completed prior to full-time enrollment in a college or university.

8.     Are vocational courses acceptable?

Traditional vocational courses are not acceptable. These include courses such as agriculture, auto mechanics, accounting and health. However, courses taught using applied approaches to teaching may very well meet the INCAA standard for a core course. The core-course requirements explain in detail the NCAAs requirements for a core course.

9.     May courses taken by a high-school student at a local college be used to meet the 13 core-course requirements?

College courses may be used to satisfy core-curriculum requirements if the courses are accepted and awarded credit by the high school for any student and meet all other requirements for core courses. For NCAA Division I only, such courses must be placed on the student's high-school transcript. Courses taken at a college will NOT appear on the high school's list of NCAA-approved core courses. The high school's list of NCAA approved core courses will include only those courses taught/offered by the high school.

10.  What documentation does the NCAA require to enable a student with a disability to use a nonstandard ACT/SAT and/or courses designated for students with disabilities?

The following documentation is required: (a) a current signed copy of a professional evaluation report that states the diagnosis of the student's disability; and (b) a copy of the student's Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Individual Transition Plan (ITP) or Section 504 Plan or statement that relates to accommodations received by the student with the disability. The NCAA national office, not the clearinghouse, processes the information.

11.  May students with a diagnosed disability use courses that are designated for students with a disability to meet NCAA core-course requirements?

Students with appropriately diagnosed disabilities may use courses for students with disabilities for the purpose of meeting NCAA core-course requirements. Courses for students with disabilities must appear on the high school's list of NCAA-approved core courses in order for a student to receive NCAA credit for the course. In order to use such courses toward a student's core-course requirements, students must document their disability with the NCAA by submitting the required documentation (see question No. 10).

12.  May a nonstandard ACT/SAT be used for initial eligibility?

Only students with a diagnosed disability may use nonstandard test scores. Please note that students with disabilities must have required documentation (see question No. 10) sent to the NCAA for review.

13.  Does the prohibition against special education, remedial or compensatory courses apply to students with disabilities?

No. In order for courses designated for students with disabilities to be approved, the course must be substantially comparable, qualitatively and quantitatively, to an NCAA-approved core course offered in that academic area.

14.  What if a student's final high-school transcript contains an error or the student has grade changes that are not included on the final transcript mailed to the clearinghouse?

Once the clearinghouse has received all required documentation, including a final high-school transcript for a student, they are able to produce a final certification report. If a high school forwards a revised final transcript to the clearinghouse, the clearinghouse will not be able to use the changes to issue a revised final certification report. Instead, any changes to a student's final high-school transcript must be approved through the initial- eligibility waiver process (see question No. 5 for more information about the waiver process).

15.  May courses taken at high school "A" be accepted if they appear on high school "B's" transcript?

No. High school "B" may provide the clearinghouse with an official copy of high school "As" transcript, but courses from one high school cannot be accepted on another high school's transcript.

16.  May courses taught via nontraditional methods (i.e.. independent study Web-based, correspondence courses) be used to meet the 13 core-course requirements?

Students may use courses taught via nontraditional methods to satisfy the core-curriculum requirements provided certain criteria are met. If approved, these courses appear on the high school's list of NCAA approved core-courses. The core-course requirements will explain in detail the NCAAs requirements for nontraditionally taught courses.

17.  How is my core-course grade-point average calculated?

Your core-course grade-point average may be calculated using your 13 best grades from courses that meet the core-course distribution requirements. Core-courses beyond the required 13 may be used to meet the core-course grade-point average if the distribution requirements are met.

18.  How are courses taken over two years counted?

A one-year course that is spread over a longer period of time (i.e., two years, three semesters) is considered as one course and would receive a maximum of one core-course credit.

19.  Where can I find a list of my high school's approved core courses?

Each high school's list of approved core courses may be found by linking to the NCAA Initial- Eligibility Clearinghouse page of the NCAA Web Site at www.ncaa.org

 

[NOTE: This is not a complete list of NCAA regulations regarding initial eligibility. Please call or write the NCAA or access the NCAA Website if you have specific questions.]

NCAA Membership Services

P.O. Box 6222

Indianapolis, Indiana 46206

317/917-6222 (phone)

800/638-3731 (NCAA Hotline)

www.ncnn-org

 

NCAA RULES REGARDING OFFICIAL VISITS

NCAA Bylaw 13.02.14.1 - Definition of an Official Visit

An official visit to a member institution by a prospective student-athlete is a visit financed in whole or in part by the member institution.

NCAA Bylaw 13.7.1.1 - One-Visit Limitation

A member institution may finance only one visit to its campus for a prospect. (This is regardless of how many sports the prospect actually plays.)

NCAA Bylaw 13.7.1.2 - Number of Official Visits - Prospect Limitation

...A prospect may take a maximum of five expense-paid visits, with no more than one permitted to any single institution. This restriction applies regardless of the number of sports in which the prospect is involved.

NCAA Bylaw 13.7.1.2.1 - Written Notification Required

Each member institution shall be required to notify the prospect in writing, at the time of its invitation but prior to the visit, of the five-visit limitation. Violations of this bylaw shall be considered institutional violations per Constitution 2.8.1; however, they shall not affect the prospective student-athlete's eligibility.

NCAA Bylaw 13.7.1.2.2 - First Opportunity to Visit

A prospect may not be provided an expense-paid visit earlier than the opening day of classes of the prospect's senior year in high school.

NCAA Bylaw 13.7.2 - Length of Official Visit

An official visit to an institution shall not exceed 48 hours. A prospect may remain in the locale in which the institution is located after the permissible 48-hour period for reasons unrelated to the official visit (i.e., flight gets cancelled), provided that at the completion of the 48-hour visit, the individual departs the institution's campus, and the institution does not pay any expenses thereafter, including the cost of return transportation to the prospect's home.

NCAA Bylaw 13.7.5.1 - Entertainment on Official Visit, General Restrictions

An institution may provide entertainment, which may not be excessive, on the official visit only for a prospect and the prospect's parents [or legal guardian(s)] or spouse and only within a 30-mile radius of the institution's main campus. Entertainment and contact by representatives of the institution's athletics interests during the official visit are prohibited. It is not permissible to entertain other relatives or friends (including dates) of a prospect at any time at any site.

NCAA Bylaw 13.7.5.2 - Complimentary Admissions, Official Visit

During the official visit, complimentary admissions to a campus athletics event may be provided only to a prospect and the prospect's parents [or legal guardian(s)] or spouse. Such admissions may provide seating only in the general seating area of the facility utilized for conducting the event. Providing seating during the conduct of the event (including intermission) for the prospect or the prospect's parents [or legal guardian(s)] or spouse in the facility's press box, special seating boxes or bench area is specifically prohibited.

 

NCAA RULES REGARDING UNOFFICIAL VISITS

NCAA Bylaw 13.02.14.2 - Unofficial Visit

An unofficial visit to a member institution by a prospective student-athlete is a visit made at the prospect's own expense. The provision of any expenses or entertainment by the institution or representatives of its athletics interests shall require the visit to become an official visit, except for the following:

a)     The institution may provide complimentary admissions to an on-campus athletics event in which the institution's intercollegiate athletics team competes, in accordance with the provisions of Bylaw 13.8.2.1;

b)     The institution may provide transportation to the prospect, when accompanied by an institutional staff member, only to view off-campus practice and competition sites and other institutional facilities located within a 30-mile radius of the institution's campus, but the institution may not provide transportation to attend one of the institution's home athletics events (on or off campus) during the unofficial visit.

NCAA Bylaw 13.6.3 - Transportation on Unofficial Visit

During any unofficial recruiting visit, the institution may provide the prospect with transportation only to view off-campus practice and competition sites in the prospect's sport and other institutional facilities (located within a 30-rnile radius of the institution's campus). An institutional staff member must accompany the prospect during such a trip. Payment of any other transportation expenses, including providing transportation to attend one of the institution's home contests (on or off campus), shall be considered a violation.

NCAA Bylaw 13.8.2.1 Entertainment/Tickets on Unofficial Visit (please also see 13.7.5.2)

During an unofficial visit, the institution may not pay any expenses or provide any entertainment except a maximum of three complimentary admissions (issued only through a pass list) to a campus athletics event in which the institutions intercollegiate team practices or competes. Such complimentary admissions are for the exclusive use of the prospect and those persons accompanying the prospect on the visit and must be issued on an individual-game basis. Such admissions may provide seating only in the general seating area of the facility utilized for conducting the event. Providing seating during the conduct of the event (including intermission) for the prospect or the prospect's parents [or legal guardian(s)] or spouse in the facility's press box, special seating boxes or bench area is specifically prohibited.

NCAA Bylaw 13.8.2.5 - Visit Unrelated to Recruitment

The limitations on providing entertainment to a prospect shall not extend to a visit to the institution's campus for a purpose having nothing whatsoever to do with the prospect's athletics recruitment by the institution (e.g., band trip, fraternity weekend, athletics team's attendance at a sporting event with the high school coach). The institution's athletics department or representatives of its athletics interests may not be involved in any way with the arrangements for the visit, other than providing (in accordance with established policy) free admissions to an athletics event on a group basis, rather than personally to the prospect.

NCAA Bylaw Interpretation - 13.8.2.1 - Unofficial Visits

"Providing complimentary admission to a prospect during a dead period." The Council reviewed an interpretation that when a prospect visits an institution's campus during a dead period and the visit is unrelated to the prospect's athletics recruitment (as per Bylaw 13.8.2.5), the prospect may receive complimentary admission(s) to an institution's athletics event, provided the athletics department does not arrange for the complimentary admission(s). The Division I Steering Committee recommended that the interpretation be revised to clarify its application to instances in which the prospect visits an institution's campus as part of a group.

 

 

 

NCAA Bylaw 14.3 - Initial Eligibility Requirements

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR "QUALIFIERS"

NCAA

Core GPA

SAT

Score

SumACT

Score

Core Courses Needed Upon

Graduation from High School:

4 years of ENGLISH

2 years of MATHEMATICS (Algebra & Geometry minimum)

2 years of PHYSICAL SCIENCE (1 year of lab)

1 year of ENGLISH, MATH or PHYSICAL SCIENCE

2 years of SOCIAL SCIENCE

2 years of ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC COURSES

* A total of 13 core courses

 

When an individual becomes a Qualifier and starts

attending college as a full time student, then he or she:

* CAN receive an athletics scholarship immediately.

* CAN practice immediately.

* CAN compete immediately.

* Is granted FOUR years of eligibility.

 

2.500

820

68

2.475

830

69

2.450

840-850

70

2.425

860

70

2.400

860

71

2.375

870

72

2.350

880

73

2.325

890

74

2.300

900

75

2.275

910

76

2.250

920

77

2.225

930

78

2.200

940

79

2.175

950

80

2.150

960

80

2.125

960

81

2.100

970

82

2.075

980

83

2.050

990

84

2.025

1000

85

2.000

1010

86

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR "PARTIAL QUALIFIERS"

NCAA

Core GPA

SAT

Score

SumACT

Score

Core Courses Needed Upon

Graduation from High School:

2.750

720

59

The core courses need to be a Partial Qualifier are the same as those for a Qualifier. Please see the 13 core courses listed above.

 

When an individual becomes a Partial Qualifier and starts

attending college as a full time student, then he or she:

* CAN receive an athletics scholarship immediately.

* CAN practice immediately.

* CANNOT compete for one full year.

* Is granted THREE years of eligibility.

2.725

730

59

2.700

730

60

2.675

740-750

61

2.650

760

62

2.625

770

63

2.600

780

64

2.575

790

65

2.550

800

66

2.525

810

67

 

"NON-QUALIFIERS"

NCAA

Core GPA

SAT

Score

SumACT

Score

Core Courses Needed Upon

Graduation from High School:

A Non-Qualifier is an individual who either does not pass the correct 13 core courses or does not meet either eligibility index for Qualifiers or Partial Qualifiers.

 

When an individual becomes a Partial Qualifier and starts attending college as a full time student, then he or she:

* CAN receive an athletics scholarship immediately.

* CAN practice immediately.

* CANNOT compete for one full year.

* Is granted THREE years of eligibility.

 

 

 

NCAA Bylaw 14.3.1 - Eligibility for Financial Aid, Practice and Competition:

A student athlete who enrolls in a member institution as an entering freshman with no previous full-time college attendance shall meet the following academic requirements, as certified by an initial eligibility clearinghouse approved by the Executive Committee, and any applicable institutional and conference regulations, to be considered a qualifier and thus be eligible for financial aid, practice and competition during the first academic year in residence.

 

 

CHOOSING A COLLEGE: WHAT STUDENT-ATHLETES SHOULD ASK

The following questions and information were developed by the NCAA Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. The committee urges prospective student-athletes (recruits) to ask college coaches these types of questions during their recruitment.

Athletics

·       What positions will I play on your team?

·       What other players are competing for the same position?

·       Will I "red shirt" my first year?

·       What are the physical strength and conditioning requirements each year?

·       How would you describe your coaching style?

·       What is your team game-plan?

·       When does the head coach's contract expire?

·       Describe the situation for walk-ons. How many typically make the team? How many eventually get to play? How many eventually earn scholarships?

Academics

·       What majors are available at your school?

·       How good is the department in my major?

·       What is the national ranking of the department?

·       What percentage of players on scholarship graduate in 4 years? 5 years? 6 years?

·       What is the cumulative grade point average of your team?

College Life

·       What is the typical class size?

·       Describe the academic support program, including study hall requirements, tutor availability, staff, class load and faculty cooperation.

·       What is the typical day of a student-athlete in your program?

·       What are the dorms like? What is the surrounding community like?

·       Will I be required to live on-campus throughout my time at your school?

Financial Aid

·       Will I receive any scholarship money? Will I receive a full or partial scholarship?

·       What does the scholarship money cover?

·       Can I receive other financial aid through the university?

·       How long does my scholarship last?

·       If I get hurt, what happens to my scholarship?

·        What are my opportunities for employment while I am a student?